Handprint Alphabet – X for X-Ray Fish Has prints for entire alphabet

Alphabet X with X-ray fish. From the Getty Images iStock / 360 collection. Artwork by jehsomwang.
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X-ray tetra or Pristella maxillaries is also commonly known as golden pristella as it has transparent body. They belong to Characidae family. These fishes are normally very peaceful and like to live in the community. They are social and very friendly and very easy to care for. It can be seen in both brackish and soft water. It is also harmless to other fish and plants.
Alphabet X with X-ray fish. From the Getty Images iStock / 360 collection. Artwork by jehsomwang.
Photo provided by Flickr
The Pristella Tetra is a very pretty little characin. It's known as the X-Ray Fish because its silvery yellow body is quite transparent. It has striking fin coloration. Its dorsal and anal fins have white tips and a striking stripe pattern of a yellow stripe followed by a black stripe. The tail fin is either red or pink. A popular albino variety has also been developed that is more subdued in color overall, but has pink eyes and pink spots. Other common names that describe this beauty include Golden Pristella Tetra, Water Goldfinch, X-ray Tetra, and Pinktailed Tetra. Today I want to write about a tough little fish with very strange skin, the X-Ray tetra.
Photo provided by Flickrx-ray fishy.....oh cousin Alex! Check this dude out!
Photo provided by FlickrX-ray of deep sea fish - HuffPost
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I dig this because, on verbal description, this sounds rather dull. X-rays of fishes. Great. But when you actually see the images you remember two very important facts: First, fishes have tons of little, teeny bones packed into a relatively small body; Second, fishes come in a wide variety of frequently crazy shapes. That all adds up to fish x-rays being way more interesting than you might initially guess.Whether at the doctor's office or in the museum lab, all x-ray images (also called radiographs) employ the same principle: a beam of x-rays is generated and focused on an object, which absorbs some of the rays. Bone is a dense tissue that absorbs most of the x-rays, whereas soft tissue such as the heart or gut absorbs fewer. The x-rays that pass through a fish are captured on film or a digital detector, which produces an image that makes the specimen appear transparent: bone is white, and soft tissue is grayishblack. The x-rays in this collection were taken at exposures of 30 to 70 kilovolts for 5 to 10 seconds, depending on the size and density of the fish.Take the scorpionfish. —runaway cast members from "Labyrinth" or something. In x-ray, you can see past the wild colors and stubbly, camouflage skin to spot the spines these fish use for delivering a numbing, toxic poison.For many years, the production of x-ray images involved a chemical film developing process. Today, radiographer Sandra J. Raredon uses a digital radiographic machine. She places a specimen on a digital tablet and “hits” it with a beam of x-rays. The rays that pass through the fish are captured on the tablet and translated directly into an image on a computer monitor. No film is used. The image is recorded as a digital file, ready for immediate study, and is ultimately archived in the files of the National Collection of Fishes.Before the discovery of the X-ray, scientists could only obtain these insights through dissection, which took time, energy, and was ultimately destructive to the specimen. X-rays give fish experts, also known as ichthyologists, a fast easy, and nondestructive way to enhance their research.The Australian National Fish Collection's new digital X-ray unit is creating stunningly detailed images to help taxonomists sort the fish from the fish.