Information to help you keep your betta fish water clean and clear

BettaSafe Water Conditioner For Betta Fish Kit | Tetra Aquarium
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Bettas are a rare type of fish (called fish) that have the ability to absorb oxygen from air as well as through their gills when in water. This is why betta fish have a higher tolerance for poor water quality and don’t necessarily need water filters or aerators. That said, a betta’s bowl still needs to be cleaned and its water changed regularly to keep it happy and healthy. With proper care, your pet betta fish can live anywhere between two and four years, sometimes even longer.
i use the water in the bottle that is for betta fish is that fine i just got mine today and have no idea how to do this
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Speaking to the technical side of the matter, we know that more room to move about isbetter. A higher volume of water allows for more stable water conditions and thwarts the waste concentrations that a polluted betta bowl is subject to—it can go from livable to toxic literally overnight. A larger tank also grants the fish more room to move and swim about. No. Please do some more research. Unless you’re going to change the water daily (stressful for the fish), bettas need a filter.
Photo provided by FlickrSo how do we get the ‘right’ water for a betta fish? Typically there are 3 sources you should go to to get your water:
Photo provided by FlickrFist time fish owner here. I am going to use bottled spring water for my betta. Do I still need to treat it with a water conditioner?
Photo provided by Flickr
Myth: Bettas, even in small and unfiltered tanks, do not require frequent water changes as they thrive in unclean conditions.
Reality: Tying back to the myth regarding the ideal water conditions of bettas, it is a common misconception that the species is found in dirty, muddy puddles, which has convinced some novice aquarists that clean water is not demanded of the species and could even be harmful. In reality, the opposite could not be more true. The selection for decorative and show finnage types in bettas has created fish that are in fact highly sensitive to water quality; unless conditions are pristine (right down to hardness and pH, even!), you can expect crown tails, half moons, and other long finned bettas to suffer deterioration of the finnage. The poor circulation to the extremities of these lofty fins also makes them a prime target for bacterial infections, a problem only exacerbated by unclean water. Make no mistake: there is no such thing as a fish that thrives in waste-laden, filthy water! For best results you should start by filling your Betta container with “aged” or “conditioned” water found in existing aquariums. Typically Bettas come from slow moving waters, even the edges of rice paddies in S.E. Asia. Tap water is suitable for them, but it should be treated to rid it of chlorine or chloramines prior to pouring it into the container, which is harmful to the fish. There are many varieties of Bettas available (Split Tails, Half Moon, Round Tail and Crown Tail to name a few) and almost every color under the rainbow. An Aquarium Adventure fish specialist can help you select a good specimen.Tips on Keeping the Siamese Fighting Fish
The Siamese fighting fish or “Betta” is one of the most popular of all aquarium fish. There are several reasons for this popularity. First, is their beautiful colors often referred to as “splendid”, thus one of the more popular species Betta splendens. They are in the family of fish called Anabantoids. As such they have a special labyrinth organ that other fish do not. This enables them to get oxygen from the water surface as opposed to using their gills to extract oxygen from the water. Because of this special feature they are able to be kept in a small container or bowl, whereas other tropical fish need a larger aquarium with added filtration. The sales of Bettas have surged in recent years as they’ve become displays in beautiful, ornate vases, bowls and glasses and easily kept on a table top, desk or counter. Although many water supplies are infiltrated with chlorine to eradicate bacteria that is harmful to human beings, chlorine can be a deadly substance for your Betta. Before you add your fish to your aquarium, it is absolutely necessary that you treat the tap water with a bottled chlorine remover which is available for purchase at any aquarium supply store or pet shop that sells fish. It’s a simple process if you follow the instructions.