Tropical Fish for Freshwater Aquariums: Rio-Negro (L 135) Plecostomus

Phantom Green Plecostomus Catfish (Posted on Facebook by Tropical Fish Hobbyist)
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If you have a new pleco (Hypostomus plecostomus) in your home, the more knowledge you have on the family Loricariidae fish, the better. Whether it pertains to life expectancy or diet, knowing what to expect can go a long way in promoting successful pet tropical fish ownership.
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The Leopard Plecostomus is easy to care for as long as there is plenty of algae and/or other algae based foods provided, making it a great fish for the beginner. The chemistry is not critical, but its quality must be good.Be aware that the Clown Plecostomus grows quickly and becomes quite large, so will require a large tank with age. This fish is often sold to aquarists coming into fish stores complaining of high algae. They will often leave without realizing how large the adult size of the fish they have just purchased is. Additionally, it is often falsely reported that this fish is a suitable algae eater for goldfish bowls. This is simply not the case. A goldfish bowl will not provide this tropical fish with enough food, nor will it have adequate space to thrive. Tropical Fish for Freshwater Aquariums: Sailfin (L-83) Plecostomus
Photo provided by FlickrTropical Fish for Freshwater Aquariums: Royal (L-191) Plecostomus
Photo provided by FlickrFreshwater Tropical Fish Online - Sultan Plecostomus - Pinterest
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Plecos are freshwater species that live in tropical waters in Central and South America, and they can therefore be successfully kept in tropical freshwater aquariums. Two of the most commonly kept Pleco species are Suckermouth Catfish (Hypostomus plecostomus) and Bristlenose Catfish (Ancistrus dolichopterus). If you purchase a “Common Pleco” from your fish store it can be one of several Pleco species that are sold under that name. It can be Suckermouth Catfish or Bristlenose Catfish, but it can also be species such as the Sailfin Catfish (Liposarcus multiradiatus) or the Liposarcus pardalis.These fish naturally range from Central America to South America and are found on both sides of the Andes Mountains as far south as Argentina, which includes some subtropical locations. Their habitat varies from swift mountain streams to backwater areas, soft-water brooks and even slightly brackish estuaries. Populations of plecos have been established worldwide as a result of irresponsible releases. For example, the common pleco (Hypostomus plecostomus) is now widely established in Florida’s freshwater and brackish waterways.Plecos are freshwater species that live in tropical waters in Central and South America, and they can therefore be successfully kept in tropical freshwater aquariums. Two of the most commonly kept Pleco species are Suckermouth Catfish (Hypostomus plecostomus) and Bristlenose Catfish (Ancistrus dolichopterus). If you purchase a “Common Pleco” from your fish store it can be one of several Pleco species that are sold under that name. It can be Suckermouth Catfish or Bristlenose Catfish, but it can also be species such as the Sailfin Catfish (Liposarcus multiradiatus) or the Liposarcus pardalis.The Snowball Plecostomus is also known by tropical fish keeping enthusiasts as the Snowball Pleco, Big White Spot, Big White Spot Pleco, White Spot Pleco, LDA33, and L142.Hypostomus plecostomus (known colloquially as a ‘sucker fish’) is the scientific name for a type of freshwater tropical and sub-tropical Central and South American fish belonging to the family Loricariidae. They are large algae eaters, and to differentiate them from small algae eaters, they are often referred to as Plecostomus, often abbreviated as plecos or plecsBe aware that the Clown Plecostomus grows quickly and becomes quite large, so will require a large tank with age. This fish is often sold to aquarists coming into fish stores complaining of high algae. They will often leave without realizing how large the adult size of the fish they have just purchased is. Additionally, it is often falsely reported that this fish is a suitable algae eater for goldfish bowls. This is simply not the case. A goldfish bowl will not provide this tropical fish with enough food, nor will it have adequate space to thrive.