Holding A Small Fish Pictures, Images and Stock Photos - iStock

Nice small fish market - Picture of Nijo Market, Sapporo - TripAdvisor
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How much smaller? Adjusting for time of year, and after checking and measuring 1,275 different trophy fish, she found that in the 1950s, the biggest fish in the photos were typically over 6 feet — sometimes 6 feet 5 inches long. By the time we get to 2007, when Loren bought a ticket on a deep sea day cruise and snapped this picture ...
Octopus Resort, Waya Island Picture: School of small fish dancing in the light
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The Red Porgy is an uncommon catch due to it's reduced populations from earlier overfishing. The Red Porgy is sometimes called Seabream and is found is waters from 60 feet in depth to the edge of the continental shelf where they can be 16 inches and weigh 2 pounds. The Red Porgy are bottom feeders who use their strong teeth to prey on snails, crabs and sea urchins from structures and they also consume worms and small fishes. The Red Porgy in this picture was caught off Naples during the winter in 125 of water on a wreck while bottom fishing. Small Fish - Picture of La Flauta, Barcelona - TripAdvisor
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How much smaller? Adjusting for time of year, and after checking and measuring 1,275 different trophy fish, she found that in the 1950s, the biggest fish in the photos were typically over 6 feet — sometimes 6 feet 5 inches long. By the time we get to 2007, when Loren bought a ticket on a deep sea day cruise and snapped this picture ...Not only are these different species, they are fished from different parts of the ocean. Goliath Grouper tend to congregate in the big holes in the limestone shelf or near bridge pilings. Tuna are deep water fish. Permit are trophy fish for flats fisherman. Small snapper are often caught close to shore, though you have to go out deep for the really big ones. (Oddly, none of these pictures show swordfish (Papa Hemingway's favorite)or Tarpon, which are favorites of trophy fishermen.) So, no, this isn't apples to apples, but all these fish are in need protective limits or a ban on commercial fishing as has been done for the Goliath Grouper and snook.I am not trying to say that there's no issue with fish stocks. I'm trying to say that this article is total BS. It's RadioLab interpreting science through their heavily biased lens, and the target demographic lapping it up (it's not just radiolab that does this). And I LIKE RadioLab! A journalist theoretically has the responsibility to tell the whole story and this one fails miserably. I don't have the scientific chops to dispute the report, I am criticizing the framing of it. Showing pictures of progressively smaller fish without even noting they are totally different species is weak and irresponsible. Krulwich is a seasoned newsman, I'd expect more!I was present when many of the 1950's photos were taken. As a teen, O met my Dad each afternoon as the boats returned where he tagged those be mouths to be mounted.
Goliath Grouper, then called Jewfish, we're being slaughtered along with the sea turtles at the Kraals in Key West.
And while there were five Naval bases on that small island, fishing continued to dominate the economy.
What one writer commented about the progression and irregularity of pictures is partly true...however, even with the preventative measures in place now for years, the Goliath Grouper and all Grouper species remain small and certainy nowhere near the numbers of years ago. Several people have pointed out that different species of fish seen in the pictures seems to negate them as evidence of overfishing or change. In fact, the species composition is part of the story. The idea of shifting baselines and fishing down the food web go hand-in-hand. Healthy marine communities are "top heavy", that is in pristine systems the bulk of the biomass is in large, apex predators. As systems are exploited these top-tier species decline in abundance and smaller species from lower positions in the foodweb become dominant. As a result, once one desirable species has been exploited, another species is targeted to fill the void. While the protection status of Goliath groupers may makes this less clear (keep in mind the frequency of people actually hooking Goliath in the lower Keys is still much lower than in the 50's and 60's), the shift from big Jacks and Permit in the 4th picture to mostly Yellowtail snapper in the most recent picture speaks clearly to the problem.