How to Keep Parrot Cichlids: 15 Steps (with Pictures) - wikiHow

Blood Parrot Cichlid Care How To Care for Blood Red Parrot Fish - Duration: 7:46
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Health Issues
Stress Spots: This is usually mistaken for Neascus (Black spot disease). Blood Parrots sometimes get Stress Spots which are black splotches on the body or fins and this is caused by stress. This is typically present you bring them home but can also show up when in cases of shyness, bullying, breeding, illness, or sometimes nothing at all. The splotches will usually disappear after awhile once the problem is taken care of.



Swim Bladder Issues: They show an abnormal swimming pattern, may even float upside down or appear to be stuck at the surface of the water, being unable to swim down, or they may lie on the bottom, unable to rise. Fish with a swim bladder disorder will continue to try and feed, showing a normal appetite. This is usually caused by a poor diet. To prevent this from happening it is recommended to feed shelled peas once a week for that days meals. This can also help with mild cases. For severe cases add 1 Tbsp per gallon of Epsom Salt into a container of water. Place the fish in the Epsom Salt bath for 20 - 30 minutes. This can be done twice a day but should only be done as a last resort. Ick/Ich/White Spot: is a common disease of freshwater fish. It is caused by the protozoa Ichtyopthirius. Ick is one of the most common and persistent diseases. Your fish will be covered with white cysts on the skin, fins and gills. Heavily infected fish looks as if they have been sprinkled with sugar and pepper grains. They may scratch themselves against gravel or decorations in the aquarium. Ick is usually deadly if left untreated. To treat ick it is best to first raise to the temperature in the aquarium to 86 - 89F. Then treat the tank with 2 tsp of salt per gallon of water or treat the water with Mardel CopperSafe. Any other treatment can potentially damage the Biofilter so other treatments are not recommended. During treatment it is not recommended that you change the water so before you treat the tank a 25 - 50% water change is recommended. Treatment should take 1 - 2 weeks depending on severity.
Blood Parrot Cichlid Care How To Care for Blood Red Parrot Fish | Facts and Information | Setting Up a Blood Parrot Tank .
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The Red Parrot cichlid fish is a super personable fish. Learn about how to care for your red parrot cichlid. We discuss how to properly set up a Blood Parrot cichlid aquarium fish tank, Talk about what to feed, what tankmates work and how many to keep in an aquarium. Join us in a video explaining the fading process and how to raise a Red parrot fish from juvenile to adulthood. My wife is interested in the Red Blood Parrot fish and the so called freshwater..
Photo provided by FlickrThree Parts:Setting up the TankCaring for Your FishResponding to Parrot Cichlid ..
Photo provided by FlickrEven blood parrot cichlids, bred in captivity by humans, thrive in warmer waters
Photo provided by Flickr
There are a few different varities of the blood parrot that are avalible. The most common is the Red Blood Parrot, which, despite its name, is really much more of an orange. There is also the Purple Blood Parrot, who also has a deceptive name, as it is actually much closer to red than purple. Something to be careful of though is that sometimes instead of breeding for the different varieties the fish farms will simply dye the fish.The parrot cichlid is named for the shape of its face which has the appearance of a parrot’s face and beak. The common parrot cichlid comes in a deep orange colouration which gave them the name “Blood Parrot Cichlid”. They also come in a whole variety of colours and patterns which will later be described in more detail. These fish grow to a maximum length of 8 inches (20.32 cm), sometimes more, and they can live for up to 50 years if they are good specimens and very well cared for.Health Issues
Stress Spots: This is usually mistaken for Neascus (Black spot disease). Blood Parrots sometimes get Stress Spots which are black splotches on the body or fins and this is caused by stress. This is typically present you bring them home but can also show up when in cases of shyness, bullying, breeding, illness, or sometimes nothing at all. The splotches will usually disappear after awhile once the problem is taken care of.



Swim Bladder Issues: They show an abnormal swimming pattern, may even float upside down or appear to be stuck at the surface of the water, being unable to swim down, or they may lie on the bottom, unable to rise. Fish with a swim bladder disorder will continue to try and feed, showing a normal appetite. This is usually caused by a poor diet. To prevent this from happening it is recommended to feed shelled peas once a week for that days meals. This can also help with mild cases. For severe cases add 1 Tbsp per gallon of Epsom Salt into a container of water. Place the fish in the Epsom Salt bath for 20 - 30 minutes. This can be done twice a day but should only be done as a last resort. Ick/Ich/White Spot: is a common disease of freshwater fish. It is caused by the protozoa Ichtyopthirius. Ick is one of the most common and persistent diseases. Your fish will be covered with white cysts on the skin, fins and gills. Heavily infected fish looks as if they have been sprinkled with sugar and pepper grains. They may scratch themselves against gravel or decorations in the aquarium. Ick is usually deadly if left untreated. To treat ick it is best to first raise to the temperature in the aquarium to 86 - 89F. Then treat the tank with 2 tsp of salt per gallon of water or treat the water with Mardel CopperSafe. Any other treatment can potentially damage the Biofilter so other treatments are not recommended. During treatment it is not recommended that you change the water so before you treat the tank a 25 - 50% water change is recommended. Treatment should take 1 - 2 weeks depending on severity.Blood Parrots like having little "dither-fish" around. They probably figure that as long as the little schooling fish aren't scared, there are no threats.