The Real Fish Tank Fish from Finding Nemo

Finding Nemo on a Real Fish Tank Laying on a Mushroom Coral - São Paulo - Brazil
Photo provided by Flickr
While tanked fish Gill’s proclamation that “all drains lead to the ocean” contains a grain of truth, the movie fails to acknowledge the fact that a flushed fish is unlikely to survive a trip down the typical drain. Water treatment company JWC Environmental and Australia’s Marine Aquarium Council were to offer public warnings that flushing would prove fatal to any pet fish. The former organization suggested that a movie that realistically portrayed a household sea creature’s voyage through the municipal sewage system would be more accurately titled "Grinding Nemo."
Finding Nemo on a Real Fish Tank Laying on a Mushroom Coral - São Paulo - Brazil
Photo provided by Flickr
Since the characters in Finding Nemo were based on real life sea creatures, everyone found out that you could buy them and have a Nemo and Marlin and the entire cast all to yourself in the comfort of your own home. This is awesome because there are things called aquariums that people can make a hobby! I even have a great freshwater fish tank with many fish I consider my babies. The only thing is, the demand for clown fish rose 40 percent, and because these fish are local to the Western Pacific and Australia (where Nemo is set) these fish are deemed endangered. Finding Nemo on a Real Fish Tank Playing on a Mushroom Coral - São Paulo - Brazil
Photo provided by FlickrIn a local fish tank we saw this cute real life Dory from Finding Nemo!
Photo provided by Flickrreal
Photo provided by Flickr
But unfortunately for them, the dentist replaces the old filter with a new one called the , which is equipped with a laser scanner that examines the tank every five minutes and a computerized voice telling the water's temperature and pH level, but no moving parts for the fish to interfere with, while they were sleeping on the day Darla was supposed to arrive. The Tank Gang react to the AquaScum with disgust. But after a brief "false alarm" as a result of the fish mistaking a for Darla, the dentist scoops Nemo out of the tank with a net, causing them to react with shock and get Nemo out by weighing down the net. But the dentist still gets Nemo out anyway, but this time with a plastic bag. Nemo attempts to roll the bag out the window, but the dentist stops him by putting him in a box, just as Darla finally arrives for real.Still want a Dory fish? Experts are acting preemptively this time around and recommending a wonderful alternative for fans that want a Dory look-alike fish, but don't want to risk damaging the future of the species. "A 'Baby Dory' fish does exist--it's called a yellow-tail damsel. I've been in the aquarium industry for many years and you would be surprised how often I would hear "Look - a baby Dory!" - from a child pointing at the yellowtail damsel in a tank. It's a fish I've steered parents toward in the past when they've requested a Dory fish, and it's a great alternative. I'm concerned about the impact this increased demand will have on this fish and want to prevent as many unnecessary losses as possible. Not only is the yellow-tail damsel much smaller than the blue tang, which can grow to more than a foot long, but it's also a very hardy fish. The yellow-tail damsel is from the less aggressive Chysiptera genus of damsels which are less aggressive and less territorial than most other damsels. With ablue tang, you're going to need a tank size of no less than 180 gallons, while yellowtail damsels can do well in 30 gallon tanks." -Mark Valderrama, expert With a smaller, easier to care for alternative to the real Dory fish, we can potentially bypass a disaster like we accidentally created when Finding Nemo was released.Nemo and his dad Marlin mostly resemble ocellaris clownfish (also known as a false percula clownfish). Clownfish are hermaphroditic, and interestingly if the film’s scenario were in reality, Marlin would become female in response to the dominant female in the group dying. Clownfish are known for their symbiosis with anemones, but they do not require one in captivity (anemones require more seasoned experience in marine invertebrate care), and they will ‘host’ anything from corals to even powerheads in the tank.Sorry, but the real nemo is actually a occelarius clownfish, not a tomato clown...How long have you had the fish? What are your paremeters, like nitrates pH etc...How long has the tank been set up? How did you acclimate the clown? How big is it? Are there any other fish in the tank? Sorry for all the ?s but these are all very important to know...It could be the New tank syndrome, or it could be he's just getting used to the tank.