Saltwater Aquarium Nitrate Reducing Products - The Spruce

Clear cloudy aquarium water, remove nitrates and simplify aquarium maintenance.
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A third choice many of our staff has used to lower nitrate levels is . BioDigest is a hyper-concentrated bacterial compound sealed inside single-dose glass vials to preserve the efficacy of the ingredients. The recommended dosage is one vial per 50 gallons of aquarium water every 15 days.
A common practice used to lower aquarium nitrates is the . In reality however, water changes are more of a nitrate dilution then removal.
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There are various devices and procedures that can lower the nitrate level. Nitrate-adsorbing filter media and anaerobic denitrifying biofilters will remove dissolved nitrate, but they will do nothing to eliminate the cause of the problem. The simplest solution is a water change. When you remove a volume of water from your aquarium, you remove all the nitrate in that volume. So, change half the water and you’ve removed 50 percent of the nitrate. High Nitrates In Tap Water | My Aquarium Club
Photo provided by FlickrNitrite Level In Tap Water | My Aquarium Club
Photo provided by FlickrApr 15, 2013 - Clear cloudy aquarium water, remove nitrates and simplify aquarium maintenance
Photo provided by Flickr
Like all living creatures, fish give off waste products (pee andpoo). These nitrogenous waste products break down into ammonia (NH3),which is highly toxic to most fishes. In nature, the volume of waterper fish is extremely high, and waste products become diluted to lowconcentrations. In aquariums, however, it can take as little as a fewhours for ammonia concentrations to reach toxic levels.Some call it the biological cycle, the nitrification process, new tank syndrome or even the start-up cycle. They all are referring to the same cycle - The Nitrogen Cycle. The aquarium nitrogen cycle is a very important process for the establishment of beneficial bacteria in the aquarium and in the filter media that will help in the conversion of ammonia to nitrite and then the conversion of nitrite to nitrates. Check out the aquarium water chemistry page (on the left) for more information on these terms.The desired species of nitrifying bacteria are present everywhere(e.g., in the air). Therefore, once you have an ammonia source in yourtank, it's only a matter of time before the desired bacteria establisha colony in your filter bed. The most common way to do this is toplace one or two (emphasis on one or two) hardy andinexpensive fish in your aquarium. The fish waste contains theammonia on which the bacteria live. Don't overfeed them! More foodmeans more ammonia! Some suggested species include: common goldfish(for cold water tanks), zebra danios and barbs for warmer tanks, anddamselfishes in marine systems. Note: Do not use ``toughies'' or otherfeeder fishes. Although cheap, they are extremely unhealthy and usingthem may introduce unwanted diseases to your tank.Like all living creatures, fish give off waste products (pee andpoo). These nitrogenous waste products break down into ammonia (NH3),which is highly toxic to most fishes. In nature, the volume of waterper fish is extremely high, and waste products become diluted to lowconcentrations. In aquariums, however, it can take as little as a fewhours for ammonia concentrations to reach toxic levels.Test your aquarium water every other day and write down your readings. You will first see ammonia levels rising. A few weeks or so later you should see the nitrite levels rising and the ammonia levels dropping. Finally, after a few more weeks you should see the nitrate levels rising and the nitrite levels dropping. When you no longer detect ammonia or nitrites but you can detect nitrates you can assume that it is safe to add your tropical fish.There are other methods to control nitrates in aquariums besides water changes. For freshwater fish tanks, live aquarium plants will use up some of the nitrates. In saltwater fish tanks, live rock and deep sand beds can have areas where can breakdown nitrates into harmless nitrogen gas that escapes through the water surface of the aquarium.