How to remove nitrate from the aquarium | Algone

Many hobbyists regard sulfur-based  as the ultimate solution for nitrate removal in a fish tank.
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Hello fishkeeping fans! It's time for me to spew out another video. I thought I'd make this video on a product I like to use called Nitrasafe, because I find it a great way to remove Nitrate from your tank. Nitrates of course aren't necessarily a bad thing. Lets remember plants need some nitrate to grow well. But excessive amounts can stress your fish.

There are plenty of products on the market and I'm sure many will do an equally good job as this but this just happens to be my product of choice. It does what it says on the tin and you can recharge it time and time again.

It's basically a little sachet of resin that you put in the filter of your tank and it gets to work removing unwanted Nitrate from the water. After a week or so when the resin is fully saturated you can remove the bag from your tank and recharge it by placing it in a bucket of salt water which is kinda cool.

If you've already tried this product and it's not for you, another product i'd highly recommend it Seachem Prime. it's a declorinator that removes all the bad stuff too including nitrate, nitrite and ammonia. But that review will have to wait for another video.

If you like the background music, it's called sad past and it's from the youtube library.

Wishing you all a great weekend
Nick
Once the tank is done cycling, your Ammonia & Nitrites should  read 0 unless you add something to the tank... like a significant number of fish.
Photo provided by Flickr
Nitrate itself is not a major issue in most cases. But as stated, it correlates very well with all the other things that do build up that we don't have test kits for. Many fish give off growth inhibiting hormones that stunt growth. Dissolved organic compounds also build up. Fortunately these are low if nitrate is low (unless the tank is planted). You can also test the to monitor water quality. You can watch it go up with times as all these things build up. There can be a lot of error if you add any aquarium salt (which shouldn't be done all the time in a freshwater tank). You also need to compare it to your tap water so you know what your starting point is. If the fish get sick or stressed and you add salt you just need to test before and after so you know how much it alone brought the up. The good thing is that a meter takes only a couple seconds and costs about $10 shipped on eBay. Nitrates in a reef fish tank can slow the growth of the coral reef and may affect the fish if not kept at acceptable levels.
Photo provided by FlickrCan we use tetra safestart during ammonia or nitrite spoke with fishes in the tank or we should take the fish out first.
Photo provided by FlickrNo, you need nitrAte in your fish tank, because it
Photo provided by Flickr
The desired species of nitrifying bacteria are present everywhere(e.g., in the air). Therefore, once you have an ammonia source in yourtank, it's only a matter of time before the desired bacteria establisha colony in your filter bed. The most common way to do this is toplace one or two (emphasis on one or two) hardy andinexpensive fish in your aquarium. The fish waste contains theammonia on which the bacteria live. Don't overfeed them! More foodmeans more ammonia! Some suggested species include: common goldfish(for cold water tanks), zebra danios and barbs for warmer tanks, anddamselfishes in marine systems. Note: Do not use ``toughies'' or otherfeeder fishes. Although cheap, they are extremely unhealthy and usingthem may introduce unwanted diseases to your tank.The desired species of nitrifying bacteria are present everywhere(e.g., in the air). Therefore, once you have an ammonia source in yourtank, it's only a matter of time before the desired bacteria establisha colony in your filter bed. The most common way to do this is toplace one or two (emphasis on one or two) hardy andinexpensive fish in your aquarium. The fish waste contains theammonia on which the bacteria live. Don't overfeed them! More foodmeans more ammonia! Some suggested species include: common goldfish(for cold water tanks), zebra danios and barbs for warmer tanks, anddamselfishes in marine systems. Note: Do not use "toughies" or otherfeeder fishes. Although cheap, they are extremely unhealthy and usingthem may introduce unwanted diseases to your tank.Your tank is fully cycled once nitrates are being produced (andammonia and nitrite levels are zero). To determine when the cycle hascompleted, buy appropriate test kits (see the section)and measure the levelsyourself, or bring water samples to your fish store and let themperform the test for you (perhaps for a small fee). The cycling processnormally takes anywhere from 2-6 weeks. At temperatures below 70F, ittakes even longer to cycle a tank. In comparison to other types ofbacteria, nitrifying bacteria grow slowly. Under optimal conditions,it takes fully 15 hours for a colony to double in size!Your tank is fully cycled once nitrates are being produced (andammonia and nitrite levels are zero). To determine when the cycle hascompleted, buy appropriate test kits (see ) and measure the levelsyourself, or bring water samples to your fish store and let themperform the test for you (perhaps for a small fee). This processnormally takes anywhere from 2-6 weeks. At temperatures below 70F, ittakes even longer to cycle a tank. In comparison to other types ofbacteria, Nitrifying bacteria grow slowly. Under optimal conditions,it takes fully 15 hours for a colony to double in size!