Neon Blue Dwarf Gourami Fish | Pet Research

Neon Blue Dwarf Gourami Fish | Pet Research
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Neon Blue Dwarf Gouramis are very hardy so disease is not usually a problem in a well maintained aquarium. Some diseases they are prone to are bacterial infections, constipation and Hole in the Head if good water quality, nutrition, and maintenance is not provided. With any additions to a tank such as new fish, plants, substrates, and decorations there is a risk of introducing disease. It's advisable to properly clean or quarantine anything that you want add to an established tank prior to introduction, so as not to upset the balance.These fish are very resilient but knowing the signs of illness, and catching and treating them early makes a huge difference. An outbreak of disease can often be limited to just one or a few fishes if you deal with it at an early stage. The best way to proactively prevent disease is to give your fish the proper environment and a well balanced diet. The closer to their natural habitat the less stress the fish will have, making them healthier and happy. A stressed fish will is more likely to acquire disease. For information about freshwater fish diseases and illnesses, see .
Neon Blue Dwarf Gourami Fish | Pet Research
Photo provided by Flickr
The Neon Blue Dwarf Gouramis are an omnivore and prefers both algae-based foods as well as meaty foods. An algae-based flake food, along with freeze-dried bloodworms, tubifex, and brine shrimp will provide these fish with the proper nutrition. Blue Dwarf / Neon Dwarf Gourami Fish Profile, Community Fish
Photo provided by FlickrPair Neon Royal Red Dwarf Gourami *4cm* TROPICAL FISH at Aquarist Classifieds
Photo provided by FlickrClick  for more about this fish, including a picture of the very similar female Neon Blue Dwarf Gourami.
Photo provided by Flickr
The Dwarf Gourami is a popular aquarium fish. It is sturdy and the males display a striking colouration. You can purchase several different colour variations of this fish, including Blue Dwarf Gourami, Neon Dwarf Gourami, Powder Blue Dwarf Gourami, Sunset Dwarf Gourami and Flame Sunset Dwarf Gourami. In its native region the Dwarf Gourami is utilized as food and is sold fresh or dried. It is one of the most common fish species in the river plains of northern India. My Neon Blue Dwarf Gouramis are beautiful, graceful fish that are also the gems of my tank. Their faces are almost human and show high intelligence. I have one shy one, and one that is unafraid, coming right up to the glass or to a finger with bloodworms. I have seen nothing but gentleness with the other tankmates.Neon Blue Dwarf Gouramis require a tank that is 10 gallons or larger. The aquarium should be heavily planted and have at least part of the surface covered with floating plants. A darker substrate will help show-off the gourami's colors, and peat filtration is recommended. Regular water changes are a must, as this gourami can be susceptible to disease. They should not be kept with large, aggressive fish, but would enjoy the company of other small, peaceful fish as well as fellow gouramis. Loud noises often scare them, so the tank should be in a quiet area.I can not in good conscience begin on the subject of Colisa lalia, the Dwarf Gourami, without stressing the importance of scientific names. Gouramis are one of the fish that should always be addressed and sold by scientific names to curb the confusion of both the fishkeeper and the retailer. Currently, the common naming convention of these fish is virtually non-existent. I have seen Colisa lalia labeled, and sold, as honey, dwarf honey, sunset dwarf honey, fire red dwarf honey, flame gourami, blue sunset dwarf honey, blue flame honey, neon blue gourami, coral blue dwarf gourami, powder blue gourami, blue dwarf, blue gourami, and probably 100 other iterations of names. How in the world is the average fish keeper going to know what they have?