Best tank size for Molly Fish? - Molly Fish Care

Goldfish and Molly fish tank - YouTube
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Fish swim bladder "disease" causes a fish to lose its buoyancy. You can identify a molly (Poecilia) with this so-called disease by observing how it is swimming. A fish with this disorder may float in a strange position, possibly vertically, on its side or upside down. You may notice that the molly is not able to swim to the top of the tank to eat food. A molly infected with swim bladder may not survive, despite treatment. There are several causes of swim bladder disease, but treatment is the same no matter what the cause. If successful, you will need to try to find the cause of the disorder and rectify it to avoid having it happen again.
Triple Sulfa may also be helpful in tank for healing of the fish epidermis that sometimes is damaged during certain cases of Molly disease.
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Edit: I should say I do keep Tetra with Molly. The Molly on the low end of their hardness range and my Tetra adapted. I was a Newbie when I began doing this but I still have a few of each in one of my community tanks. As long as the water parameters are stable and the environment clean the fish flourish. Goldfish and Molly fish tank
Photo provided by FlickrMolly Fish Tank
Photo provided by FlickrMolly Fish Tank
Photo provided by Flickr
The Molly is a tropical fish that prefers a little salt in their water. A teaspoon of aquarium salt per 5 gallons of water will go a long way in helping them. You may also see them in saltwater tanks from time to time. There is a local reef store here that keeps black molly fish in a regular saltwater tank with similar sized species. The molly is a very attractive tropical fish that comes in many different colors such as orange, green and black. Some of the more popular varieties include the sailfin, balloon and the dalmation.Molly fish, commonly known as mollies are some of the most beautiful aquarium fish one can keep. There are several breeds in the market such as black molly, the balloon belly molly, and the Dalmatian molly among others. Regardless of their breeds, the care issues such as the tank size requirements and the feeding are basically the same. However, when choosing the right tank size for molly fish, the size of some varieties can compel one to go for a smaller or a larger tank size.The Molly fish is a livebearing tropical fish that can be fairly easy to breed. For many aquarists the biggest problem is not getting them to breed but stopping them from breeding. If left in a tank with other adult fish, the baby mollies will get eaten.It seems that the Molly fish is such a widespread aquarium fish now that you can basically put it in any style tank you want. As far as decorations and setting up the tank I would say that you only want to worry about having enough hiding spaces for the fish that are really timid and getting bullied to make sure that they have places to hide. Other than that you were pretty wide open as far as you're setting up and their habitat style they are a middle level swimmer so they're pretty wide-open as far as what is available.Secondly the size and breed of mollies to be placed in a given tank should also be a consideration in choosing the right tank. The short-finned molly is relatively small and therefore undemanding in tank size. This variety grows to a maximum size of 4 inches (10 cm) and it can be housed comfortably in a 10-gallon tank. However, one can provide them with a 29 gallon tank, if they really want to have them thrive. The sailfin mollies which grow to a maximum size of 6 inches (15 cm) require a tank with a minimum capacity of 29 gallons (110 liters). The larger the tank, the more stable is the environment for the fish since mollies are prone to issues that come with sudden fluctuations in water quality- an issue common in smaller tanks.Really, the only shortcoming to the black molly is its need for hard, alkaline water. Of course, this isn't really a problem for aquarists in the South East, and is in fact something of a plus. Unlike all those neons and dwarf cichlids that demand soft and acidic water to do well, here's one fish that just standard issue London tap water. However, if you are keeping a soft water aquarium or have a planted tank with CO2 fertilisation, chances are the hardness and pH will be too low for the black molly. Ideally, this molly wants a pH of at least 7.5 and the water does need to be at least moderately hard. The addition of salt isn't strictly necessary, but many people have found that it does help to keep mollies healthy and free of diseases like fungus and fin-rot; in this case, raising the specific gravity to around 1.002-1.005 will do the trick nicely and allow you to mix in a few brackish water fish as well.