How to Rig Live Shrimp for Fishing | Salt Water Sportsman

After catching a few dozen live shrimp we put them to good use. Tarpon fishin in miami
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The other main way we hook shrimp is through the head. There is a ‘sweet spot’ just behind the horn on their head but in front of their heart (the big black spot). If you go through the heart the shrimp will die and you will lost the lively effect which is the point of this style. Try to get it perfectly lined up in the center, and hook from the bottom coming out the top. This is a good presentation for more picky gamefish such as snook or tarpon. The shrimp can freely flinch it’s tail which often excites a hungry gamefish. However if there are lots of ‘picker fish’ around it is much easier for them to steal shrimp off in this fashion. This works well with a jighead, or often we fish with a tiny bobber and a regular j-hook with a tiny split shot near the hook. This way you can drift the shrimp around mangrove shorelines etc… and simply watch for when the bobber goes down to indicate a strike.
In the Florida Keys, live shrimp are a killer bait - if you know how to present them to the fish.
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Live-bait shrimping presents anglers and shrimpers alike with economic restrictions. It all comes down to supply and demand. The demand is always going to be present from anglers. As Alabama guides tell us, live shrimp are simply the most reliable bait for inshore fishing. Live Bait Station Fishing Minnow Portable Live Shrimp Bucket Aerator Cooler Net #Frabill
Photo provided by FlickrTry one of these five different ways to rig live shrimp for success. #fishing
Photo provided by FlickrEveryone knows how to fish with live shrimp, right?
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One of the best tried and proven ways to fill a boat full of keeper trout and redfish is using a live shrimp under a popping cork. I prefer to use a treble hook, leaving about 18-24 inches of line between the hook and the popping cork, depending on the depth of water the fish are in. If I am fishing a shallow reef, then I shorten the length of line between the cork and the hook to prevent hang-ups, but if I am working birds, I want the shrimp to work a little deeper so I lengthen the line.
When the fish are feeding, you will never go wrong using live shrimp under a popping cork. Last summer I fished a few reefs in the Port Lavaca area with a good friend of mine. After the shrimp hit the water and three quick pops of the cork, a fish was on. We limited out on trout in 30 minutes and had a couple of nice reds in the boat. His wife thought we had motor trouble because we were back at the house so soon.Working reefs with live shrimp under a popping cork is the way to go as opposed to using artificial lures. You can catch both redfish and trout with the same set up instead of having to change lure types and colors to match what the fish are eating.With the exception of earthworms, live shrimp is the most widely demanded fishing bait along the southern coastal region. Live shrimp is preferred by many and usually purchased at the local bait shops. But if you live in an area of brackish water or along the beaches, shrimp can be caught. Shallow water shrimp (as opposed to deep water ocean shrimp) are often estuarine dependent which is good news for those of us who like to catch our own bait. For example, along the upper St. Johns river in North Florida around late summer to early fall, shrimp can be hauled in literally by the full.
With the exception of earthworms, live shrimp is the most widely demanded fishing bait along the southern coastal region. Live shrimp is preferred by many and usually purchased at the local bait shops. But if you live in an area of brackish water or along the beaches, shrimp can be caught. Shallow water shrimp (as opposed to deep water ocean shrimp) are often estuarine dependent which is good news for those of us who like to catch our own bait. For example, along the upper St. Johns river in North Florida around late summer to early fall, shrimp can be hauled in literally by the full.

There are two cast net methods used. The first used during daylight hours employs a cast net with sewed on webbing about 4" above the net's sinkers. The net is cast into the deeper waters where the shrimp congregate. The sewed on webbing acts as a wing keeping the cast net fully open as it sinks to the bottom to depth of sometimes 25 to 30 feet. The net must come to rest on the bottom. This will generally catch several dozen. If a cast net does not have a sewed on webbing simply use two rolls of duct tape and sandwich the net between the two sticky sides of the duct tape about 4" above the sinkers.


Be careful not to tape up the draw strings around the cast net, ensure the draw strings are outside the taping as you go. Be sure to tape around the full circumference of the net. Use a table top to help manage the process and keep in mind that once the taping is complete, you can not remove the tape.



The second method used to cast net shrimp occurs after dark. At night, shrimp in many estuaries move into shallow water generally around 5 feet or less. Hang a lantern that shines over the water surface, use a little shrimp meal as bait and soon the shrimp will come in. Be sure and check your local fishing regulations for any restrictions on using a cast net.The lowly shrimp may be the most commonly used bait south of the Mason-Dixon line. Aside from being fairly cheap and easy to keep alive, these prolific crustaceans rank high on the menu of many popular inshore species, including grouper, bonefish, tarpon, snook, seatrout, redfish and jacks. Here are several ways to rig a live shrimp for fishing in different situations.