Everyone knows how to fish with live shrimp, right?

In the Florida Keys, live shrimp are a killer bait - if you know how to present them to the fish.
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Red Drum (Spottail Bass): The most commonly used method for red drum fishing is a standard deep floating terminal rig baited with live or dead shrimp or small crabs. Although school-size red drum can be caught year-round in inshore estuarine waters, young-of-the-year red drum typically show up in June-August. However, fall is the best time to catch small school-size drum. Fishing for young red drum (
Try one of these five different ways to rig live shrimp for success. #fishing
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I often drift to cover as much water as possible. By Mid October Specks will be in all the larger passes leading into Lake Catherine, Lake Pontchartrain & Lake Borgne. The Bridges over Lake Pontchartrain will be a hot Spot. Live Shrimp on a Drops hot rig or a Carolina rig will catch Specks along the legs of the bridges over the lake. Plastics become productive toward the end of the month. Dudley’s, Gulp and Matrix on a Golden Eye jig will produce Specks also. This pattern will remain until the water temperatures approach the lower 50’s when Specks will be in deeper water without much current. Areas like Geohegans Canal, Lakeshore estates, and the MRGO near the “Wall”. Redfish will still be caught in the shallow waters in the marsh. Shrimp under a cork is always a good choice along with Spinners, Spoons, weedless worms. For videos and more weekly fishing pictures check out Angling Adventures of Louisiana on Facebook. Here are three ways to hook a live shrimp to a jig head for inshore saltwater fishing
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Photo provided by FlickrHere are three ways to hook a live shrimp to a jig head for inshore saltwater fishing
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On days when artificials fail, when cut bait is ineffective, the anglerusing shrimp -- either live or dead -- usually scores. When you can't scorewith shrimp, fishing, indeed, is horrible.With the exception of earthworms, live shrimp is the most widely demanded fishing bait along the southern coastal region. Live shrimp is preferred by many and usually purchased at the local bait shops. But if you live in an area of brackish water or along the beaches, shrimp can be caught. Shallow water shrimp (as opposed to deep water ocean shrimp) are often estuarine dependent which is good news for those of us who like to catch our own bait. For example, along the upper St. Johns river in North Florida around late summer to early fall, shrimp can be hauled in literally by the full.
With the exception of earthworms, live shrimp is the most widely demanded fishing bait along the southern coastal region. Live shrimp is preferred by many and usually purchased at the local bait shops. But if you live in an area of brackish water or along the beaches, shrimp can be caught. Shallow water shrimp (as opposed to deep water ocean shrimp) are often estuarine dependent which is good news for those of us who like to catch our own bait. For example, along the upper St. Johns river in North Florida around late summer to early fall, shrimp can be hauled in literally by the full.

There are two cast net methods used. The first used during daylight hours employs a cast net with sewed on webbing about 4" above the net's sinkers. The net is cast into the deeper waters where the shrimp congregate. The sewed on webbing acts as a wing keeping the cast net fully open as it sinks to the bottom to depth of sometimes 25 to 30 feet. The net must come to rest on the bottom. This will generally catch several dozen. If a cast net does not have a sewed on webbing simply use two rolls of duct tape and sandwich the net between the two sticky sides of the duct tape about 4" above the sinkers.


Be careful not to tape up the draw strings around the cast net, ensure the draw strings are outside the taping as you go. Be sure to tape around the full circumference of the net. Use a table top to help manage the process and keep in mind that once the taping is complete, you can not remove the tape.



The second method used to cast net shrimp occurs after dark. At night, shrimp in many estuaries move into shallow water generally around 5 feet or less. Hang a lantern that shines over the water surface, use a little shrimp meal as bait and soon the shrimp will come in. Be sure and check your local fishing regulations for any restrictions on using a cast net.Obviously, you must use care in selecting the size hooks forshrimp fishing. While the size isn't as important using dead shrimp becauseyou can always put on more than one shrimp to cover a big hook, size isvital using live shrimp. Depending upon the size fish you're seeking, hookscan range from 3/0. This latter size usually is for sea trout in the Aberdeenwire style. Usually the smaller the hook, the better. The smaller, lighterhooks hamper the least the live shrimp's swimming ability. Naturally, ifyou're after bigger prizes, you have to sacrifice swimming ability for hookingpower.