13 Best Freshwater Fish For Your Home Aquarium | Fish Keeping Advice

50 Beautiful fish aquarium designs - Kerala home design and floor plans
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If you’ve been considering dipping your toes into the waters of owning a pet fish, there’s never been a better time to dive. Like all pets, live fish have individual personalities and temperaments – some can become aggressive and territorial in a community tank, while others are comfortable enough to follow the motion of the ocean. Petco’s fish store associates can help you find the right live pet fish for your unique needs. Generally speaking, freshwater aquarium fish can be easier to care for and maintain than their saltwater cousins. Many freshwater species are more adaptive to changes in your tank’s water temperature and habitat. Most are also raised in captivity on aquarium foods and flakes, so they transition more easily to a home aquarium environment. Saltwater aquarium fish require precise temperature and habitat environments in their tanks, and may take some time to adjust to a fish flake diet. They may require more hands-on care, but the results are undeniable: the splashes of color these pet fish bring to an aquarium tank brighten any space.
1. A fish aquarium tends to free your home from all the evils and maintains a serene, fortuity atmosphere.
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When discussing types of aquariums or aquarium systems, brackish water systems are very few and far between in the hobby. Brackish water is a mixture of saltwater and freshwater. It’s like in the middle, not freshwater, but not as strong as marine saltwater. If you can picture the Mississippi river emptying into the Gulf of Mexico, that is brackish water. It’s simply a mixture of saltwater and freshwater. The selection of fish available is very few with the most popular being the Puffer (Tetraodon nigroviridis) that is labeled “Freshwater Puffer” when it is actually a brackish water fish. People generally do not have much success with brackish water fish due to the water conditions are hard to maintain and most of the fish that are brackish fish have not been housed properly before they end up in your home aquarium. hi,entrance of my home is north and on east wall we have show case.. plz tell me where to keep fish aquarium as it should be in NE area
Photo provided by FlickrIf you've ever walked into a home with a beautiful wall fish tank, you know that these awesome aquariums can really liven up a room.
Photo provided by FlickrI got 2 aquarium at home1 towards NW2nd towards NEi kept 1 arowana in one tankand the other 1 gold fish
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Selecting a fish tank for your home decorating you want to find a functional and energy saving aquarium in a pleasing form. Unusual as well as a custom made aquariums make great home decorations and create stunning centerpieces that enhance modern interior design with original design, small or large size and unique shape. Tropical fish tanks can be round and rectangular, free shaped and oval. Small and large glass fish tanks make spectacular focal point for interior decorating, personalize your home decor and Feng Shui it for wealth.Owning and maintaining a vibrant and colorful filled with various fish species is a wonderful way to experience underwater biodiversity while also caring for some easy-to-maintain pets. However, as fish lovers sprinkle that flaky, unappealing fish food into their aquarium while the different fish apathetically gather their dinner, aquarium owners may opt to instead create their own . Not only does making fish food at home offer a fun and involved experience that brings owners closer to their fish, but it also ensures that the different species of fish are receiving a healthy, well-balanced diet. Fortunately, making fish food at home is not a complicated or time-consuming process, and it only requires the right ingredients and a little culinary expertise.Fish can go for several weeks without food. Some believe they can go for 3 or more weeks even. Yes, this is true believe it or not and your fish will be fine while you're away. Your tank may even look cleaner when you get home from vacation since there should be less wastes in the water from the lack of fish food entering the aquarium and less wastes being produced from fish eating that fish food.Watch more How to Take Care of an Aquarium videos:



When deciding on what shark to get, you want the best shark for your fish take. It first depends if you have a freshwater tank or a saltwater tank. The sharks that you'll find for freshwater tanks are not true sharks. They're not cartilaginous. They're bony fishes. Their fin patterns and their morphology closely resemble saltwater sharks, so for that reason they're called sharks, but they're not true sharks.

Saltwater is where you'd find the real sharks. For freshwater, most of the shark get very, very large. The iridescent sharks, tricolor sharks, they get really, really big, I mean, three to four feet in nature, but they happen to be very hardy. So you can keep them in a small aquarium, maybe 30 to 50 gallons in size. But they're going to quickly outgrow it, and it's cruel to keep a fish that gets three or four feet in nature restricted to a tank that's only three or four feet long. It's just really, really cruel, so I don't recommend a lot of the freshwater fish that are called sharks for home aquariums. If you have to have a freshwater fish that's called a shark, you can get a redtail shark. They don't get as big. The flying foxes kind of look like sharks. They don't get terribly large.

But for saltwater, the sharks that I would recommend are any of the cat sharks, bamboo, banded cats, dog chain. Those sharks stay on the bottom. Even the epaulettes from Australia, those are really cute sharks. They walk around on their pectoral fins. They also get large, so you want to make sure you have a large aquarium, but because they're not pelagic swimmers like black tips and white tips, any of the open swimming sharks, they're more suitable to home aquariums.

If you have to have something that looks like a great white or a baby great white, like a black tip, you're going to need a really large tank, and those tanks are very expensive. I'm talking, people would recommend a 200 to 300 gallon tank. I wouldn't put them in anything less than 1000 gallons. That tank needs to be round in shape. It needs to be eight to ten feet in diameter. They're just not going to fare well in anything smaller. And the upkeep and the maintenance on an aquarium like that is pretty staggering. You really have to know what you're doing. You need to have a lot of money or be really into this hobby to be that dedicated to keep one these open water reef sharks.

So to wrap it up, for saltwater, I would recommend one of the bottom-dwelling cat sharks. Nurse sharks are really good when they're small, but they get really large, so I don't feel that they're suitable for captivity. And then for freshwater, redtail sharks, tri-colors or balas sharks or iridescent sharks are great when they're small. But again, they're going to get really large and you're going to have to get them a much bigger tank, like the 200 to 300 gallon tank to keep them when they're adults.