First Freshwater Fish Tank (Cycling) - YouTube

Hi there, I have cycled saltwaterfish tanks before, but I have never done it for freshwater tanks
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10. Add fish! – When both ammonia and nitrites are zero, you can finally add fish as long as your nitrates stay at an acceptable level (For marine tanks, that’s about . For freshwater tanks, that’s about.). If the nitrates are too high, do a water change. Remember never to do a water change, as this may cause the nitrogen cycle to start all over again!
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An aquarium can be cycled one of several ways: via the various cycling conditioners on the market that are supposed to create an instant cycle, enabling you to add fish within a day or two after adding the water; via the traditional method, which involves adding ammonia in the form of a piece of raw shrimp or some fish food to help cycle the tank; via a few other methods, including using some of a friend’s freshwater aquarium gravel or squeezing the dirty water out of well-used filter media to help add beneficial bacteria to your tank to start the process. It contains sections for the novice and more advanced hobbyist alike, many tropical fish pictures are includedCycling A Freshwater Tank.
Photo provided by FlickrHow to Cycle a Fish Tank (with Pictures) - wikiHow
Photo provided by FlickrFreshwater Aquarium Cycling - Petcha
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I would encourage all fish keepers to gain an understanding of the nitrogen cycle as this will help you understand exactly what is going on inside your tank and how you can deal with water quality problems should they arise.The simple answer is yes, an aquarium must be cycled properly before you can safely add your fish. It doesn't matter whether the tank is 15 gallons or 500 gallons, it's still got to be cycled. If you were to simply fill your tank with water and then add all your fish at once then there would be such a massive buildup of ammonia, the chances are your fish would be dead within a few days.Traditionally, there are two ways to cycle a fish tank. Both methods will involve introducing ammonia into the tank which will be the food the bacteria need to survive. The most common method of cycling an aquarium is to use small community fish that produce the ammonia themselves. A kinder, more acceptable way to cycle a fish tank is to use a method called the "fishless" cycle. This also involves adding ammonia to the aquarium, but as a name suggests you do not use live fish. In this article, we are going to use fish as it's probably easier for a beginner to undertake, and we wouldn't be happy with youngsters handling pure ammonia as it can be dangerous. If you would prefer not to use live fish then read this article on how to carry out a fishless cycle.We would recommend that you use small community fish like the Barb. The Tiger and Cherry Barb are absolutely ideal as they are quite a hardy species of freshwater fish and unlike some more sensitive species, won't turn belly up as soon as they are exposed to ammonia. If you are cycling a very small tank less than 20 gallons then you are probably better off using much smaller fish like guppies or neon tetra. Your fish store should be able to give you advice based on what fish they sell.It's important not to add too many fish as this will create a large ammonia spike very quickly which will probably just kill the fish within a few days. For a 55 gallon tank, 10 barbs would be appropriate. For a 75 gallon tank, you could go up to 15, for 100 gallons plus, you're looking around 20 upwards.It's become quite popular to kick start the cycling process by seeding your new aquarium with biological media that already contains live nitrifying bacteria.Certain fish species are hardier than others and seem to tolerate the start-up cycle better than others. For freshwater tanks, the is a very hardy fish that many use to get the nitrogen cycle started. For saltwater tanks, some have reported success using to get the process started. Again, using fish to cycle is not a good idea and you may be throwing your money (on dead fish) out the window. There is a better way. Read on, young grasshopper.We would recommend that you use small community fish like the Barb. The Tiger and Cherry Barb are absolutely ideal as they are quite a hardy species of freshwater fish and unlike some more sensitive species, won't turn belly up as soon as they are exposed to ammonia. If you are cycling a very small tank less than 20 gallons then you are probably better off using much smaller fish like guppies or neon tetra. Your fish store should be able to give you advice based on what fish they sell.Other fish suitable for cycling a freshwater aquarium include nonfancy guppies, Corydoras paleatus, C. aeneus, X-ray tetras, pupfish and some of the hardier labyrinth fish, such as banded gouramis and paradisefish. In coldwater tanks, small goldfish work well, but fancy varieties are best avoided in favor of the hardier comets, shubunkins and standards.