Can fish really get aids? | Yahoo Answers

Can you get aids from a fish? | Yahoo Answers
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On the other hand, there is a disease informally known as "angelfish AIDS," and a similar one (maybe even the same one) called "discus plague," which cause the decline and eventual death of fish of these two species. But the names are just analogies; it isn't the human disease, and humans can't get it.
Can i get aids from a fish? | Yahoo Answers
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As shown in , HIV-related knowledge was high among respondents, 86 percent of women and 92 percent of men knew that people can prevent getting the AIDS virus by using a condom every time they have sex. Eighty six percent of women and 95 percent of men said that people can prevent getting the AIDS virus by having one uninfected partner who has no sexual intercourse with other partners. Eighty four percent of women and eighty eight percent of men were able to cite that that people can prevent getting the AIDS virus by using condoms and limiting sex to one uninfected partner. Almost all respondents were knowledgeable about the role of abstinence in HIV prevention; ninety one percent of women and eighty nine percent of men knew that people can prevent getting the AIDS virus by abstaining from sexual intercourse. Compared to knowledge of single methods for HIV prevention, the survey showed that comprehensive knowledge of HIV transmission was low among the respondents; it was 32 percent in women and 40 percent in men. Comprehensive knowledge of HIV is a composite variable that was defined as “knowing that consistent use of condom during sexual intercourse and having just one uninfected faithful partner can reduce the chance of getting the AIDS virus, knowing that a healthy-looking person can have the AIDS virus, and rejecting the two most common local misconceptions about transmission or prevention of the AIDS virus”.Some members of the fishing communities still have misconceptions about HIV transmission. The proportion of respondents who knew that a healthy-looking person can have the AIDS virus was 90% in women and 91% in men. The proportion who knew that the AIDS virus cannot be transmitted by mosquito bites was slightly higher in men (54%) than in women (48%). Eighty three percent of women and 88% of men knew that the AIDS virus cannot be transmitted by supernatural means. Furthermore, 64% of women and 72% of women knew that the AIDS virus cannot be transmitted by sharing utensils with someone who has AIDS. Thirty six percent of women and 43% of men rejected the two most common local misconceptions and said that a healthy-looking person can have the AIDS virus.Knowledge of PMTCT was moderate; 84% of women and 73% of men knew that HIV can be transmitted by breastfeeding. On the other hand, 73% of women and 69% of men knew that the risk of MTCT can be reduced by mother taking special drugs during pregnancy. The proportion of women and men who knew that HIV can be transmitted by breastfeeding and the risk of MTCT can be reduced by mother taking special drugs during pregnancy was 61% in women and 57% in men. Mar 21, 2010 - Best Answer: *facepalm* No, fish cannot get HIV or AIDS, and you cannot get it from them
Photo provided by FlickrCan fish get AIDS? - Tapatalk
Photo provided by FlickrHIV & AIDS Information :: Fish pedicures unlikely to cause HIV infection
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A. Now there's an interesting question! The answer is, no. Birds in general have a higher metabolic rate than we do, which demands that they process their food as quickly as possible. This means getting it into a form from which they can extract the energy they need, quickly and efficiently. Birds, including eagles, have adaptations for doing this. Most importantly, part of their stomach has turned into a gizzard, which we don't have, in which food is ground down to a fine consistency to permit rapid digestion. In eagles, this is also the place where pellets are formed. These are masses of material from prey that cannot be digested, such as fur, feathers, and occasionally bone, that then travel backwards from the gizzard up to the mouth and are cast (like vomited) out the mouth. Depending on what they have eaten, pellets are formed after the meal, overnight, and are usually cast out the next morning. Most fish are digested completely. Eagles have very strong stomach acids, and can digest bone quite well, which aids them in their own bone formation and in their egg-shell formation. Another major difference is that eagles (and other birds) have something called a crop, in the upper alimentary track (esophagus) where food can be stored for days. This is extremely beneficial to eagles, who can store up to two pounds of food in their crop when prey is abundant, so they can then go without food for several days if need be. There are more differences, but these are two of the major ones.