How to feed bettas blood worms - YouTube

I bought my betta fish for 3 weeks and he only eat the dried bloodworms I got
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Give your beautiful Betta a tasty meal of San Francisco Bay Brand Betta Food Freeze Dried Bloodworms to help support a long and vigorous lifespan. Bloodworms are filled with the protein that your Betta needs to grow and maintain optimal health. Bettas absolutely love freeze dried bloodworms. You can use this delicious fish food as part of a complete diet for your Bettas or supplement as a treat. The freeze drying process allows San Francisco Bay Brand Betta Food Freeze Dried Bloodworms to last longer without sacrificing the overall quality of the food. Freeze dried bloodworms lock in the taste and nutrition of live specimens while providing added safety. Freeze dried bloodworms protect your Betta by limiting the risk of introducing harmful bacteria and toxins into the tank. The freeze drying process also preserves the shape of the worms. When you sprinkle this delicious treat into the water, the pieces will quickly soften, allowing your fish to snack without a problem. There are many reasons why bloodworms make a great diet choice for Bettas. Carnivorous fish like Bettas need a steady diet of protein, which San Francisco Bay Brand Betta Food Freeze Dried Bloodworms can provide. It takes energy for your Betta to swim around the tank. Another reason to choose these bloodworms is that they don’t cloud the water. This can help extend the time between tank cleanings, especially if your Betta aquarium doesn’t have a filter. This feature will also help keep the water clearer for more enjoyable viewing of your brightly-colored Betta. Most importantly, Bettas enjoy the taste of this snack, so you’ll always have a special treat for your aquatic pet. This tasty Betta diet comes in a convenient fliptop vial for easier feeding.
Omega One Freeze Dried Betta treat Bloodworms are a natural treat for freshwater and marine fish
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Bloodworms are a lot like betta fish pellets in that they are sold everywhere as fish food and have many of the same nutrients. They are often sold freeze-dried and you will need to get them wet before feeding them to your plants. Again, they are or your local pet food store. I have no personal experience with using bloodworms as food, but many carnivorous plant growers swear by them. They appear to be a bit more expensive than Betta pellets, but the choice is completely up to you. I’m sure neither feeding method has any significant advantage over the other. It’s just personal preference. Feb 24, 2017 - Omega One Freeze Dried Betta treat Bloodworms are a natural treat for freshwater and marine fish
Photo provided by Flickrlarvae are replaced by daphnia, bloodworms, and brine shrimp for those Betta fish raised and kept in captivity.
Photo provided by FlickrFreeze Dried Bloodworms or Red Mosquito Larvae is great for discus, eels, bettas angels, gouramis, platys, swordtails, tetras, barbs, and most community fish.
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Similar to other fish that are kept as pets, Bettas need to be fed with the on a regular basis. Betta fish are carnivorous. They feed on zooplankton, water-bound insect larvae and mosquito larvae in their natural habitats. The zooplankton and larvae are replaced by daphnia, bloodworms, and brine shrimp for those Betta fish raised and kept in captivity.Bettas, like most animals, can not eat all protein all the time. They require some fiber in their diet to help them process these foods. I suspect the reason this rumor started was because someone fed their betta bloodworms every day and never offered them a source of fiber leading to the bloating or constipation of their fish. What they didn’t understand was that, in nature, bettas are digesting the exoskeletons and other fibrous material of insects to help them maintain regularity. As fish owners, we are solely responsible for providing a well balanced diet for our bettas, which means we must offer them nutritious foods as well as fiber. This can be achieved by breaking up their diet with foods that contain an exoskeleton like mysis shrimp or flightless fruit flies that contain fiber rich wings. As many betta keepers know, blanched skinless pea is a great source of fiber. Additionally, giving your fish one day of fasting a week can also help them to achieve regularity. Like other pets, bettas sometimes don’t know when to stop and will gorge themselves on their favorite foods, such as bloodworms. When they do this, or if you’re overfeeding your fish, they’ll become bloated, which can cause serious health problems and even death. To tell if your betta is full, look for a slightly rounded stomach just beneath the gill area.Consider the size of your fish when determining how big each meal should be. Generally speaking, an adult betta should eat two to four brine shrimp or bloodworms per meal. Fry will eat increasing numbers of micro-worms as they grow. Your best bet is to drop a few on the bottom of the tank for each fry. The fry should nibble at them throughout the day.