This video's about bettas in the wild under simulated conditions

Having bred the wild Betta fish fries now releasing to the wild of their nature habitat.
Photo provided by Flickr
The above image will be familiar to anyone who is familiar with the betta fish. A small bowl is, after all, all a betta fish really needs, right? They don’t move much, and their natural habitat in the wild is the equivalent of a puddle. A bowl should be more than large enough for a fish like this, shouldn’t it?
Having bred the wild Betta fish fries now releasing to the wild of their nature habitat.
Photo provided by Flickr
Betta fish () are also called Siamese fighting fish for their native range and aggressive nature. Originally native to the Mekong River and its tributaries throughout Laos, Vietnam, Thailand and Cambodia, these fish are adaptable and also live in rice paddies and drainage ditches. They can be invasive species that threaten native fish in other areas, however, and are not generally welcome in wild habitats outside their range. May 7, 2017 - At some point in their history, the wild betta fish habitat perpetuated the myth they prefer small and low-oxygen habitats
Photo provided by FlickrLooking at the wild betta fish that when in their nature habitat, the surrounding place or its living place are badly polluted. That why its body is so many parasites .
Photo provided by FlickrJan 22, 2013 - In the wild betta fish habitats are often quite dirty, shallow, puddles without much oxygen
Photo provided by Flickr
Looking at the wild betta fish that when in their nature habitat, the surrounding place or its living place are badly polluted. That why its body is so many parasites ...Betta fish () are also called Siamese fighting fish for their native range and aggressive nature. Originally native to the Mekong River and its tributaries throughout Laos, Vietnam, Thailand and Cambodia, these fish are adaptable and also live in rice paddies and drainage ditches. They can be invasive species that threaten native fish in other areas, however, and are not generally welcome in wild habitats outside their range.Wild Betta: Betta splendens, small (7.5 cm) fish in the gourami family, native to slow moving, stagnant, overgrown waters in Thailand, Viet Nam, Cambodia and Laos. Can survive in waters with low oxygen content by breathing air from the surface. Feeds on zooplankton and other insect larvae. Bubble nest builder. Lives about 2 years. Reaches sexual maturity around five months. Tropical (warm waters). Suffers much decline due to habitat degradation and pollution…Bettas are popular for small aquariums, but how much do you really know about these fantastic fish? Learning more about betta fish can help you decide they are right for you.About BettasBetta fish () are also called Siamese fighting fish for their native range and aggressive nature. Originally native to the Mekong River and its tributaries throughout Laos, Vietnam, Thailand and Cambodia, these fish are adaptable and also live in rice paddies and drainage ditches. They can be invasive species that threaten native fish in other areas, however, and are not generally welcome in wild habitats outside their range.These fish are highly aggressive, and males will fight one another, often to the death. Even females can be aggressive, though they are usually more social than males. In a community aquarium, bettas will attack other brightly colored or flamboyant fish, but get along better with plainer, less colorful species.Adult bettas grow to 2-3 inches long, not including the length of their fancy, flowing fins. Males have far more elaborate fins than females, and captive bettas have been bred to produce fins in a wide variety of shapes. Wild bettas have smaller fins and are generally dull, camouflaged shades of gray, brown or green, but captive bettas can be found in a rainbow of colors, including turquoise, orange, red, green, blue, gold, purple, yellow and copper, or combinations of those colors.Bettas can breathe air or get oxygen through their gills, making them a good fish for less active tanks. With proper care, these fish can live 3-5 years.Tips for Your BettaIf you want to adopt a betta or add a betta fish to your aquarium, it is important to provide proper care for the fish so it is as comfortable and healthy as possible.Bettas can be beautiful fish to own, and understanding these fish and their unique behavior and needs can help you provide the best possible habitat for your betta to thrive.