Barbs - Tropical Fish Keeping - Aquarium fish care and resources

Barbs fish | aquarium fishes | fish aquarium | fish tank | tropical fish | live fish
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Due to their aggressive and dominant nature, it is not ideal to keep barbs in artificial tanks with smaller of tropical . At the same time, barb will also hunt medium sized if there is a lack of food, and so are best kept on their own (just barbs) or with much larger of fish.
Barbs fish | aquarium fishes | fish aquarium | fish tank | tropical fish | live fish
Photo provided by Flickr
I've bought some Hikari small sized pellets specially made for the likes of small fish such as Barbs, Guppies, Tetras, etc, so I'll be mixing their diet with those pellets, Tropical fish flakes, Blood worms, Peas, and other foods. Barbs fish | aquarium fishes | fish aquarium | fish tank | tropical fish | live fish
Photo provided by FlickrBarbs fish | aquarium fishes | fish aquarium | fish tank | tropical fish | live fish
Photo provided by FlickrBarbs fish | aquarium fishes | fish aquarium | fish tank | tropical fish | live fish
Photo provided by Flickr
The Tiger Barbs were the first fish I got for my tropical tank. Two Tiger Barbs and two green Tiger Barbs. They are constantly chasing each other and are very fun to watch. These fish are great for starting and add color to your tank. The Tiger Barbs were the first fish I got for my tropical tank. Two Tiger Barbs and two green Tiger Barbs. They are constantly chasing each other and are very fun to watch. These fish are great for starting and add color to your tank. Barb's consist of some of the most popular of all tropical fish, adding color, interest, and beauty to any larger community aquarium. These fish are active schooling fish that require plenty of swimming room and a tight fitting lid, as they are prone to leaping out of the aquarium when startled.While they are technically classified as a subtropical fish, they can tolerate both tropical and cool water tanks. As long as the temperature of the tank is kept close to their preferred range 64-75°F (18-24°C), they will remain both happy and healthy.The gold barb remains small in the home aquarium, and grows to a maximum length of just under three inches(2.8 inches). With that being said, most will only grow to about two inches – especially if they are kept in smaller aquariums. On average, they will live for around three years, but some exceptionally well cared for gold barbs can live up to five years.HousingThe gold barb is a peaceful and hardy fish, and will do well in most community fish tanks. It’s tolerance for cool water and docile nature makes it one of the few good tankmates for goldfish, although you have to be sure that the water temperature doesn’t fall too low during the winter months (if you live in a northern climate).Because of their small size, they can comfortably be kept in a 10 gallon (38 litre) fish tank, but larger tanks will provide a healthier and more stable environment for them. If at all possible, they should be provided with at least a 20 gallon (76 litre) long fish tank. And as a general rule of thumb, the larger the tank that can be provided, the better it is for the fish in the long run.Like most other commonly kept barbs, gold barbs are a schooling fish and should always be kept in groups of at least five. If they are kept in groups of less than five, they will spend most of their time in hiding and will become stressed – which can eventually lead to illness and death. Keeping them in groups larger than five also has the added benefit of bringing out more of their natural behaviour and making them more active – two things any dedicated fish keeper should strive for with their fish.Since they are such an active fish, there should always be an open space in the aquarium to allow for open swimming. Any plants should be planted in a manner to ensure that a swimming space is always kept open for the gold barbs and should be placed at the sides or at the back – as should any ornaments.When choosing a filter for gold barbs, the best choice is usually an HOB (hang-on-back) filter. The benefits of a HOB filter are two-fold – the first being that they are usually the most economical choice. The second benefit is that they provide some current to the fish tank, which gold barbs benefit from having in their environment. You will often see some of the gold barbs playing in the filter outflow, and sometimes they will even try to jump into the filter.The Rosy Barb is also known in certain circles as the Red Barb and is a popular freshwater tropical fish that will bring a lot of activity to your tank. The Rosy Barb is generally peaceful but like many barbs, can become fin nippers if they are not placed in a small school of 5 or more. They are also very aggressive eaters and will accept flake fish food with gusto.Rosy Barbs are hardy, and they can be kept in slightly cooler water than is usual for tropical fish. Temperatures of 68 to 72 degrees Fahrenheit are acceptable for this subtropical species. Rosy barbs do not have any special care requirements, but it’s worth noting they aren’t quite as boisterous as their tiger barb cousins. They are not wallflowers like the , either, but they do appreciate an aquarium without too much excitement. Rowdy cichlids or lone tiger barbs would likely harass them to death.