Assorted Balloon Molly fish (3+)

Assorted Balloon Molly fish (3+)
Photo provided by Flickr
The Molly is a tropical fish that prefers a little salt in their water. A teaspoon of aquarium salt per 5 gallons of water will go a long way in helping them. You may also see them in saltwater tanks from time to time. There is a local reef store here that keeps black molly fish in a regular saltwater tank with similar sized species. The molly is a very attractive tropical fish that comes in many different colors such as orange, green and black. Some of the more popular varieties include the sailfin, balloon and the dalmation.
Balloon Molly Care - Tropical FishAll the things you need for taking care of balloon mollies.
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The Neon Butterfly Lyretail Balloon Molly is well suited for any community tank because of its peaceful nature and is compatible with other peaceful, large fish that can be in similar water conditions. Signs and symptoms of potential pregnancy in your Balloon Molly fish.
Photo provided by FlickrBalloon Belly Molly, Assorted. 10 gallon tank. Live bearers so only one gender (males?) and they mix well with other community fish.
Photo provided by FlickrTropical Fish for Freshwater Aquariums: Balloon Molly - Live Aquaria
Photo provided by Flickr
The Balloon Molly prefers a tank of at least 30 gallons with lots of strong plants such as Java fern, Sagittaria, Vallisneria and Anubias. They require a good filtration system because of their hearty appetites. The Balloon Molly is well suited for the community tank because of its peaceful nature, and is compatible with other peaceful, large fish that can withstand similar water conditions. They may pursue their young and the young of other fish.Loved this fish. Balloon Molly - My latest acquisition to my 20 gal. tank. Mine looks similar to the one pictured here. Quite impressive dorsal & beautiful colouring. I hope he does well!The Balloon Molly is omnivorous and requires both meaty foods as well as algae. Provide these fish with an algae-based flake food, as well as freeze-dried bloodworms, tubifex, and brine shrimp.The balloon molly is a fancy version of the common molly fish with a large distended abdomen. This unusual molly can come in either short-fin or sail-fin varieties and may be kept with all other types of mollies. Like other live-bearing fish, the balloon molly grows quickly, reaching sexual maturity at around 3 months of age. Accordingly, the balloon molly has a relatively short life expectancy.Balloon Molly. One of my favorite tropical fish. Sadly they are one of the most depressing. Their life spans are usually only a year due to heavy inbreeding. To get that plump belly and arched spine they are selectively bred with mollies that have scoliosis. So they usually die of organ complications. Sad way to die for the name of fish fashion.The easiest way to tell a male molly from a female is by looking at the anal fin. If you start at the back of the fish and move forward, the anal fin is the first fin on the bottom of the fish. In the case of balloon mollies with their rounded bodies, this fin points the same direction as the caudal or tail fin. In females, the anal fin is a regular triangular fin. In male balloon mollies, the fin is rolled into a tube-shaped organ called the gonapodium. If a fish has its fins clamped against its body, it might be hard to spot, but this is still the best way to tell male mollies from females.The balloon molly fish has a life expectancy similar to those of other types of mollies kept in captivity: three to five years. This life span is based on ideal conditions, such as brackish water or saltwater rather than freshwater, which can make a balloon molly fish susceptible to disease and illness. If this type of molly is kept with other fish, the balloon molly may need special monitoring to stay alive and healthy. The fish's large belly makes him a slow swimmer and feeder, and larger fish may prevent him from getting enough food. There is no information available regarding a balloon fish's life expectancy in the wild, because the variety is a man-made creation -- no such specimens develop in the wild.This is the video of my Moon tail balloon Molly fish, which was kept just in a Bowl. One day, when I woke up, I saw her chasing other bowl mates aggressively. While looking closer, I saw some little fries (baby fishes) swimming and hiding in gravel! I quickly removed tank mates and let her spawn more fries. Since it is a livebrearer fish, it released live babies instead of eggs though there were a few yellow eggs and a few pre-mature babies too. When she finished, I collected all fries from bowl gravels to a plastic bowl using water sucking through a thin pipe. I feed them crushed fish food and released their mother too with them. Amazingly, the mother didn't eat any baby all the day! There were around 30 babies alive when I shifted. I think she released more than that but many of them were eaten by a Betta and Tetra Widow (Bowl mates) as their stomachs were looking very inflated. Enjoy the video of this joyful occasion. Don't forget to give me comments. :)