Aquarium sump pumps reviews | Top 3 products compared in 2017

Fluval Sea Sump Pumps for Marine Aquariums - YouTube
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running on it, I would highly recommend these pumps, you really don't get better for your buck. These pumps are very powerful so I actually only need one of them running, the other one is purely there for backup. People often say it's impossible to have too much filtration. However, it is on the other hand possible to have a pump that is too much for your aquarium/sump. For instance, one of my pumps will circulate over 3000 gallons of water an hour. If you have two pumps running then that 6000 gallons of water an hour. Even though things will work okay, the water will be running so quickly between the sump and the aquarium, there will be an absolutely terrific amount of noise caused by all the water running through the system. So bear this in mind when choosing your pump.
I have a 32mm drain going down into my sump (hole on top), the return is a 25mm pipe with a D&D H2Ocean Aquarium Pond Flow Pump FL 3000.
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While in our experience and testing their sister company (Via Aqua/Commodity Axis of California) has passed up the basic Rio Pumps in price, reliability & innovation (based on our experience), the HF line of Rio Pumps is second to no other product in terms of innovation with these patented high flow/ pressure water pumps that are designed specifically for the high flow needs of a deep aquarium sump or pond that has to lift greater distances to water features. SP2 Aquarium Sump Pump
Photo provided by FlickrSP4 Aquarium Sump Pump
Photo provided by FlickrSP4 Aquarium Sump Pump | 14337 | Water Pumps | Fluval
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Most aquariums are closed systems. In a closed system, there is noplace for water to leak out. , ,and are all closedsystems. Water is taken out of the fish tank through a tube, pumpedthrough the sterilizer or filter, and returned to a point inside thetank. This is called a closed system because there isn't any pointalong the water's path where it is not controlled andcontained. Closed systems do not need a sump.While pumping water from the sump up to the display aquarium is fairly straightforward, there are a couple things to consider. Like other parts of plumbing an aquarium sump, there are many ways to accomplish the same thing.In most cases, water is pumped from the sump into the aquarium,and then allowed to flow back into the sump. In this way, the pump isallowed to run continuously. In some cases, however, there may notnormally be water getting into the sump. In these cases, the pumpneeds to be switched on and off as water collects in the sump. This isnormally accomplished with a float switch, similar to the floats thatturned off the water in old-style toilets, or the switches thatautomatically turn wells back on when stock water tanks start to getlow.If the aquarium looks as if it will begin to over flow, unplug your pump. Close the ball valve you installed slightly, and switch the pump on again. Wait for the system to “equalize”…you should notice the water level drop in your sump as the display aquarium is filled to the top. Top the system off with new water to maintain an appropriate “minimum-level” in your sump, or a few inches above your pump intake.If the aquarium looks as if it will begin to over flow, unplug your pump. Close the ball valve you installed slightly, and switch the pump on again. Wait for the system to “equalize”…you should notice the water level drop in your sump as the display aquarium is filled to the top. Top the system off with new water to maintain an appropriate “minimum-level” in your sump, or a few inches above your pump intake.Its always a good idea to observe the system regularly for the first few hours to ensure the water levels stay equalized.Adding sump to existing tank is just that simple.
After installing your sump, you are free to add your protein skimmer and other filtration devices to your sump.
Add a highly efficient protein skimmer. Add a .Another recommendation I make to all of my customers is to add a media reactor to your system. This will dramatically reduce nutrient levels in your system. I generally recommend granular ferric oxide (GFO) media that removes phosphates from your system. A new product, bio-pellets are a great way to reduce both nitrates and phosphates. Though the effect may not be as dramatic as with a GFO reactor.In most cases, the sump will be only three-quarters full, unlike the display aquarium, which will be full to within an inch or 2 of the top at all times. Many factors will determine exactly how full your sump is. Make sure all power heads servicing sump-based filtration equipment are submerged at all times and that plenty of room remains to accommodate the back-flow from the display tank during a power outage or return pump failure. As a general rule of thumb, the more water in the system the better, so long as you take precautions to avoid flooding over the top.