C.E.T® AquaDent™ and Oral Hygiene Rinse™ (Virbac): For Cats

Hygiene Chews and Aquadent Water Additive: The Oral Hygiene Chews for dogs and cats are.
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Intended for dogs and cats over 6 months of age. For dogs over 25 lbs. add two teaspoonfuls (10 mL) of C.E.T. AquaDent to one quart (960 mL) of fresh drinking water daily. For small dogs under 25 lbs. or cats, add 1 teaspoonful (5 mL) of C.E.T. AquaDent to one pint (475 mL) of fresh water. Provide additional non-treated water as needed. Discard any treated water not consumed witin 24 hrs. Prepare fresh C.E.T AquaDent solution each day. As with any product not intended for human consumption, please keep out of reach of children.
For small dogs under 25 lbs (11 kg) and cats: Add 1 teaspoonful (5 mL) of CET AquaDent to one pint (475 mL) of fresh water.
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Keeping your pet healthy is important to every pet owner; and yet, according to the American Veterinary Medical Association, nearly 2/3 of pet owners neglect their pet's dental health. Then it’s no wonder that dental disease is the most common disease affecting both cats and dogs. What's worse is that dental diseases can cause bacteria and infections that affect the heart and kidneys such that they act as a serious threat to your pet's overall health.

There are many ways that you can help combat dental diseases like gingivitis and periodontal disease. Though brushing your pet’s teeth regularly is the surest way to care for your pet’s teeth and gums, it can also be useful to use supplements and specialized . Certain chew treats have special textures that work to scrape plaque and tartar off of your pet's teeth and gums while supplements can offer protection through a variety of mechanism.

One supplement that promotes dental health in both cats and dogs is , a liquid solution that can be added to your pet’s drinking water. This solution contains chlorhexidine gluconate which works both to combat the formation of plaque and to freshen your pet's breath. This product works great and leaves cats and dogs with cleaner teeth and healthier gums- but why take our word for it? Check out these reviews of CET Aquadent left by real customers who purchased the product here at EntirelyPets! CET Aquadent for Dogs & Cats.
Photo provided by FlickrCET AquaDent Drinking Water Additive for Dogs and Cats, 500 mL.
Photo provided by FlickrAquaDent Drinking Water Additive for Dogs and Cats, 500 ml.
Photo provided by Flickr
C.E.T. AquaDent is intended for use in dogs and cats over 6 months of age. For small dogs (under 25 lbs) and cats, add 1 teaspoonful (5 ml) of C.E.T. AquaDent to 1 pint of fresh drinking water daily. For dogs over 25 lbs, add 2 teaspoonfuls (10 ml) of C.E.T. AquaDent to 1 quart of fresh drinking water daily. Provide additional drinking water as needed.Shake before using. Light sedimentation is normal. For dogs over 25 lbs. (11 kg). Add two teaspoonfuls (10 mL) of C.E.T. AquaDent to one quart (950 mL) of fresh drinking water daily. For small dogs under 25 lbs. (11 kg) and cats, add 1 teaspoonful (5 mL) of C.E.T. AquaDent to one pint (475 mL) of fresh water. Provide additional non-treated water as needed. Discard any treated water not consumed within 24 hours. Prepare fresh C.E.T. AquaDent solution each day. As with any pet product not intended for human consumption, please keep out of reach of children.C.E.T. AquaDent Dental additive. Formulated by veterinary dental specialists to help freshen your pet’s breath and prevent plaque accumulation when used in conjunction with a regular home dental care program. simply add C.E.T. When added to pets drinking water daily, CET AquaDent freshens dogs and cats breath and helps prevent plaque accumulation. The easy-to-use, convenient additive comes in 750-mL bottles and is intended for dogs and cats 6 months of age and older.I can’t believe the last comment where the person questioned your motives for this site. As for myself, I am thrilled to find this website and the information you put on it. I have looked at a couple of other sites on stomatitis but they are very clinical, not personal like yours and, to me, this is a very personal issue. First of all, I never had a cat before this. I have had dogs my entire life, growing up and throughout my marriage. Last summer, we adopted two sister kittens, which our three boys named Angela and Hermione. Angela began having the teeth and mouth problems a few months ago. She was barely a year old. To make a long story short, because I know that you have lived the story, our regular vet tried antibiotics, Aquadent in her water, Greenies treats for plaque, pain med, and at one point did a dental prophy to clean her teeth. I was already giving her L- lysine for feline herpes and it was working beautifully for that. When the inflammation kept returning, she sent us to another vet, who is considered a “dental specialist”. She put Angela to sleep and x-rayed her teeth. She called me and immediately recommended pulling all of her teeth. She pulled the side teeth right away, and some of them were disentigrating. She could tell that the other teeth were headed in the same direction. In addition, she also had the extreme inflammation in her throat. I felt confident giving the go- ahead to remove all of the teeth, even though I had starting reading your website in the meantime, because we had literally tried so many of the things that you mention already. Angela had her teeth removed two days ago. After reading your site, I knew to ask the dentist if she had done x-rays after surgery to check for bone fragments. She assured me that she had and was actually thrilled that I was informed enough to ask that question( so that is a high five to you). Angela seemed great yesterday; she was eating canned food and even a couple of tiny bites of my son’s jelly sandwich. (We never normally give the cats people food, but she was attacking him for it so he just had to indulge her). Today, she is not as well. I think her pain shot is wearing off because they said it would last about three days. I did come home with some pain med to give, capsules to open and sprinkle in her food, and started trying to give her that last night, but now am struggling to get her to eat anything to give the med in. I am praying that she is just hurting now from surgery and stitches and not the stomatitis. We are so hoping that pulling her teeth will take care of the problem. I have ordered the plaque off from amazon and plan to start giving her that as well as continuing the lysine. I want her to have every advantage I can give her. It is just amazing to have somewhere to share all of this with someone who understands. Sorry my post is so long, but thank you for giving me the opportunity to share our story.