How to get rid off from "Anchor worms" from an infected fish

Good luck getting those anchor worms under control. We hope your fish feels better soon!
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Just want to update you on my little Ollie – he is still alive and swimming, and the stick thing (the anchor worm sticking out of his skin, I guess) has fallen off from the red bump under his chin. He seems a little skittish and hides in the back of the tank when I turn the light on… I don’t want him to get picked on by my other fish but I want him to get the treatment in the tank to kill the worms???
A fish suffering from an anchor worm infestation will show the following signs:
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One of the most notorious crustacean parasites that infest fish is the anchor worm, . There are several species of anchor worm, all of which are parasitic on fish. The complete life cycle of the anchor worm takes 17-33 days, depending on the temperature. At 68°F (20°C), for example, the cycle takes 25 days; below 59°F (15°C) it may not complete at all. Good luck getting those anchor worms under control. We hope your fish feels better soon!
Photo provided by FlickrA fish suffering from an anchor worm infestation will show the following signs:
Photo provided by FlickrGood luck getting those anchor worms under control. We hope your fish feels better soon!
Photo provided by Flickr
Almost all parasitic disease are similar and can be grouped into two groups- internal and external parasites. The most effective way of treating internal parasite infections is through medicated fish food. For external parasite, medicated baths are very effective. Baths of 10-30 minutes in 10mg of ptasium permanganate per liter of water works very well against fish louse, anchor worms, ergasilus, and flukes. Lernaea species, commonly known as “anchorworms,” are crustacean, copepod parasites that can infect and cause disease and mortality in many types of freshwater fishes, especially wild-caught and pond-raised species. Infestations with Lernaea are most prevalent in the summer months and occur more commonly in stagnant or slow-moving water bodies. Symptoms: Scratches agasint decorations, white thread-like structures attached to the body.
Description: Anchor worm is similar to ich in that it starts out embedded in the fish's skin. After several weeks, the actualy worm emerges, lays eggs, and dies. The holes left from the worm allow bacterial infections to enter. Anchor worm is not a true worm, and is a rather strange parasite. It is actually a crustacean! Sadly though, this makes them a bit harder to get rid of. Its clinical name is Lernaea, and this tiny pest can cause must damage and distress to a fish. With a lifecycle similar to other parasites, the free swimming young attach to fish where they then burrow deep within the tissues of the skin or gills. They then travel deeper within the tissues, reaching the muscle where they then develop for a number of months. During this time it may be very difficult to tell if a fish is infected or not.Anchor worms are crustaceans and are parasites that infect the fishes. Once they infect the fishes the fishes are prone to other diseases which cause the death of the fish. It is actually not the anchor worms that cause the death of the fish but the other diseases that affects the fish after it is infected by the anchor worms. The risks of the fish to attract other infections are high after it is affected by the anchor worms. The newly hatched anchor worm, or nauplius, is elliptical in shape and free swimming in the pond water. The nauplius moults into a second stage (he metanauplius), which is also free swimming. Subsequent juvenile stages are parasitic and must find a fish host, where they settle on the gills. When these juveniles mature into adults, the males mate with the females and then become nonparasitic and leave the host.